AWARD WINNING CHIROPRACTIC CLINIC!

Home2018-12-11T10:01:30+00:00
Loading...

What Contributes to Musculoskeletal Dysfunction?

Injury

There are two main types of injuries which can affect the body...

Injury

One is acute and painful and the other is chronic and lingering. The first type is caused by a strong and heavy load or force, leading to sudden failure in structure and function (i.e tearing of a muscle due to a heavy lift or a bone fracture from a fall). The second results from a repetitive or permanent overload, leading to continuously increasing pain and dysfunction (i.e muscle spasm and hardening of the muscle or a repetitive strain type injury)

Stress

The effect of short and long-term stress on the body...

Stress

Short term stress leads to increased muscle tension, which is necessary for the ‘fight or flight’ response (a response designed to protect you from short term danger, such as moving out of the way of a car if it is about to hit you). In contrast, long term stress causes the muscles in the body to be in a more or less constant state of guardedness. When muscles are taut and tense for long periods of time, this may trigger other reactions in the body and even promote stress-related disorders as a consequence.

Poor posture

The effect of poor posture on the body…

Poor posture

Good posture is a state of skeletal and muscular balance and alignment that protects the supporting structures of the body from progressive dysfunction and injury. In a poor, or faulty, posture (aka postural dysfunction), the result is an imperfect relationship between various skeletal structures of the body, and this may produce strain on the body’s supporting framework. The longer spent in a position of poor posture, the more likely dysfunction and injury is to happen.

Lack of Exercise

The effect of a lack of exercise on the body...

Lack of Exercise

Muscles require activation to maintain their strength, and the same is true of tendons and bones. If there is a lack of activation (lack of exercise), de-conditioning develops, leading to functional and structural deficits. As a result, a muscle is no longer able to stabilize joints and ligamental structures adequately. Joint instabilities and failures, incoordination connected with pain, movement abnormalities & overloading of joints may be the consequence

Too Much Exercise

The effect of over-exercising on the body...

Too Much Exercise

This can be as bad as not exercising enough. Exercising too much leads to an increase in stress hormone (cortisol) production within the body. Cortisol is an essential hormone for the body, and in the short-term, is a positive thing as it is necessary for the ‘fight or flight’ response and helps to reduce inflammation. But long-term or excessive release of cortisol can lead to increased break down of muscle and supressed immune function and therefore increased risk of injury and poor healing.

Fatigue

The effect of fatigue on the body...

Fatigue

If your body is fatigued for any reason – your muscle performance will decrease making injury more likely. This could be the result of prolonged overactivation of a particular muscle/group of muscles (for example when running a marathon) or if you do not get enough sleep. We should each get 8 hours sleep per night. Between 10pm2am our bodies go through physiological repair, and 2am-6am psychological repair. If we are consistently going to bed late, or not getting a full 8 hours sleep then we will not be getting the repair we need for any microtraumas that happen through the day to heal, which can lead to more serious injuries.